Tag Archives: hyacinth

Tulip Time – Plant bulbs for a Spring surprise!

2 Nov

It may seem odd to be already thinking about Spring but if you love the vibrant fresh colours that bulb flowers deliver, it’s time to plant now!

Here are some quick tulip-planting tips to get your Spring flower display started.

1. Find a sunny spot
Though most bulbs prefer a sunny location, you can still plant them under trees as the bulbs will bloom before the leaves on the trees are fully out.

2. Plant in clusters  for bold effect
To get maximum impact, don’t plant them in a straight line or dot them here and there in the garden. Instead, arrange bulbs in groupings of 5 to 9 or more.

3. Layer-it-on!
Your Spring display will have greater impact if you layer bulbs according to bloom time and depth requirements (sounds complicated, but all bulb packaging clearly identifies both of these important facts).  For example, the same area of soil can hold crocuses in the top 13 cm (five inches), hyacinths at 16 cm (six inches) deep and daffodils and tulips at about 20 cm (eight inches) down.  The result is a full Spring season of blooms fr0m late April to early June.

4. Avoid creating a buffet for local critters! 

Some bulbs, including tulips and crocus are a favourite food for squirrels. Others, such as daffodils, fritillaria, alliums a are not quite as appealing.  If squirrels are a nuisance, put chicken wire over the bulbs. It can be left in place all winter and bulbs bloom right through it in Spring.  Be sure to clean up after planting because the papery bits left on the ground is a signal to critters that there is likely buried treasure nearby.  Also, your can try a dusting of cayenne pepper or blood meal over freshly planted bulbs but don’t be surprised if this doesn’t slow them down – squirrels are crazy-smart and quickly learn from tricks your neighbour’s may have already tried!

5. Spring Maintenance Tips
Let bulb foliage “die back” naturally for six weeks after before cutting back their leaves, because the leaves store food for the following year’s bloom. But, dying foliage can be unsightly so pair bulbs with perennials as their foliage will camouflage the bulb foliage as it dies back.  For example, the purple foliage of these Plum Pudding Coral Bells makes the orange tulips pop!

Orange Tulips contrasted against Purple Coral Bells

Purple tulips with pansies underneath




Advertisements

A natural touch at the Royal Wedding

29 Apr

Savvy Kate chose Shane  Connolly, an English  floral designer,  whose is known for using seasonal, organic flowers and employing a sustainable approach by using as much growing, rather than cut, plants and trees in his floral arrangements.

Kate’s Bouquet

The bouquet personified Kate – classically beautiful, thoroughly English and reserved with purpose.  Containing all organic, freshly cut flowers, each were selected based on their significance to the Royal Family, the Middleton Family and the Language of Flowers.

  • Sweet William means gallantry (how appropriate!!!)
  • Lily-of-the-valley symbolizes the return of happiness
  • Hyacinth signifies the constancy of love
  • Ivy signifies fidelity, marriage, wedded love, friendship and affection.
  • Myrtle is the emblem of marriage and love

Kate herself requested that all the cut flowers will be donated to local charities BUT  what ever will happen to her bouquet?  Personally, I would’ve loved to see Kate toss it over her shoulder following the romantic balcony kiss!

The Abbey

The dramatically simple floral displays in Westminster Abbey featured all locally grown flowers from the Royal Estates and other growers in the country including azaleas, rhododendron, euphoria, wisteria and lilac.

The most impressive feature were the six 20 feet-high English Field Maples and two Hornbeams that lined the dramatic aisle.  Thankfully much care as been taken with these trees as they were planted in large custom designed containers.  Following one week of public viewing in the Abbey, they will taken to private royal family gardens  (Highgrove Gardens) to be replanted.  Now that’s a wedding keepsake that will grow and flourish as they do!